• Momentum Building for Repealing Gun Free Zones

        Read More
  • Obama Strikes Again with a New Gun Ban

  • A Time for Mourning

    -- And then time to end the military gun ban! Read More
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3

GOA News

  • Two Shootings
  • Guns Under Obama
  • Larry Pratt
  • Utter Failure
  • Failed Background Checks

A Tale of Two Shootings, and Why Gun Control is Killing Us

 

In the wake of Thursday night’s Louisiana shooting, the media has made much ado about the President’s “prediction” that law gun control laws would lead to more shootings.

But the reality is that strict gun control laws made Thursday night’s shooting at the Lafayette Grand Theater possible.

While facts are still pouring in, here’s what we already know:

Read More

Gun production has doubled under Obama

Gun production has more than doubled over the course of the Obama administration, according to a new report from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives.

Read More

GOA's Larry Pratt is the Second Most Powerful Gun Rights Activist
-- The 100 most influential pro-gun rights advocates

Newsmax is out with our list of 2015's 100 Most Influential Pro-Gun Rights Advocates.

Read More

Leading gun-rights group calls background checks ‘utter failure’

That Dylann Roof was able to purchase a firearm despite a drug arrest comes as evidence that background checks have been an “utter failure,” says a leading gun-rights group.

Read More

GOA Responds to the FBI Director on Background Checks

The FBI Director today said a flaw in the NICS system allowed Dylann Roof to successfully pass a background check before purchasing the gun he used to kill nine people at the Charleston A.M.E. church.

Read More

Self-Defense Corner

  • Clerk Fights Back
  • Constitutional Carrier
  • Nude Homeowner
  • CCW in Action!
  • Mass Killing Stopped

Houston Store Clerk Fights Back, Killing Two Of Three Armed Robbers

The news reporter for this station summed up gun ownership for self-defense in her opening segment; “Those who work here were prepared because they know what it’s like to be victims.”

Well, almost. It’s good to be armed before knowing what it’s like to be a victim, but you get the idea.

Robbed just 12 days earlier, the workers at the Super K store in Houston were prepared for trouble this time around.

When three armed men stormed into the store, they went to the register and pistol-whipped an employee. One of the armed men waited by the door to hold it open. The owner’s brother was on break, but still in the store, when the robbery was happening.

Read More

Constitutional Carrier Thwarts Robbery In Topeka Less Than Two Weeks After New Gun Law Is Signed

It’s amazing what armed citizens can do to help preserve the peace when government gets out of the way, and allows law-abiding citizens to exercise their Second Amendment rights.

Kansas Gov. Sam Brownback just signed a bill legalizing so-called “constitutional carry”—allowing citizens to exercise their right to carry a firearm for self-defense without permits—less than two weeks ago.

It has already proven instrumental to thwarting a robbery.

24 year old Joey Tapley was a key witness in Friday’s armed robbery for weapons inside the Academy Sports and Outdoors store in Topeka.

Read More

A Burglar Broke Into a Texas Man’s Home. What He Saw Next Had Him Screaming an Apology and Jumping Through the Window.

Sleeping naked could be the latest innovation in home security, provided you’re imposing enough to scare would-be burglars out of their wits.

A Georgetown, Texas man said that he was awoken Wednesday night by a flashlight moving outside his bedroom door, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported.

He checked on his sleeping wife, grabbed his 9mm handgun and went to investigate — stark naked.

“I have a tattoo of the grim reaper, my hair is sticking up all crazy and I’m naked,” said the homeowner, who asked that his name be withheld for safety reasons. “I’m not sure if [the burglar] was more afraid of me or the gun.”

Read More

[VIDEO] Off-Duty Cop Takes Out Thug With Incredible Shot During Pharmacy Robbery

Two armed robbers picked the wrong pharmacy to knock off in São Paulo.

According to a video uploaded to Liveleaks, the man in a leather jacket is a warrant officer in the São Paulo Metropolitan Police.  From start of the robbery to the time the second robber beat feet, this off-duty police officer was a smooth operator every step of the way!

Read More

Man shot, killed after breaking into ex-lover's home in Upper Marlboro, Md.

A man was shot and killed during a home invasion in Upper Marlboro, Maryland early Monday morning.

Police were called for a report of a home invasion at a house inside of a gated community in the 6100 block of Blue Sage Lane around 2:40 a.m.
Sources tell ABC 7's Brad Bell that the deceased was previously in a relationship with the homeowner and called the homeowner the night before threatening to come to the house and “kill everybody inside".

Read More
McCain's Constitution
by George Will
as seen at Townhall.com

Presidents swear to "protect and defend the Constitution." The Constitution says: "Congress shall make no law... abridging the freedom of speech." On April 28, on Don Imus' radio program, discussing the charge that the McCain-Feingold law abridges freedom of speech by regulating the quantity, content and timing of political speech, John McCain did not really reject the charge:

    I work in Washington and I know that money corrupts. And I and a lot of other people were trying to stop that corruption. Obviously, from what we've been seeing lately, we didn't complete the job. But I would rather have a clean government than one where quote First Amendment rights are being respected that has become corrupt. If I had my choice, I'd rather have the clean government.

Question: Were McCain to take the presidential oath, what would he mean?

In his words to Imus, note the obvious disparagement he communicates by putting verbal quotation marks around "First Amendment rights." Those nuisances.

Then ponder his implicit promise to "complete the job" of cleansing Washington of corruption, as McCain understands that. Unfortunately, although McCain is loquacious about corruption, he is too busy deploring it to define it. Mister Straight Talk is rarely reticent about anything, but is remarkably so about specifics: He says corruption is pandemic among incumbent politicians, yet he has never identified any corrupt fellow senator.

Anyway, he vows to "complete the job" of extirpating corruption, regardless of the cost to freedom of speech. Regardless, that is, of how much more the government must supervise political advocacy. President McCain would, it is reasonable to assume, favor increasingly stringent limits on what can be contributed to, or spent by, campaigns. Furthermore, McCain seems to regard unregulated political speech as an inherent invitation to corruption. And he seems to believe that anything done in the name of "leveling the playing field" for political competition is immune from First Amendment challenges.

The logic of his doctrine would cause him to put the power of the presidency behind efforts to clamp government controls on Internet advocacy. This is because the speech regulators' impulse is increasingly untethered from concern with corruption. It is extending to regulation in the name of "fairness." Bob Bauer, a Democratic lawyer, says this about the metastasizing government regulation of campaigns:

    More and more, it is meant to regulate any money with the potential of influencing elections; and so any unregulated but influential money, in whichever way its influence is felt or achieved, is unfair. This explains the hand-wringing horror with which the reform community approached the Internet's fast-growing use and limitless potential.

This is why the banner of "campaign reform" is no longer waved only by insurgents from outside the political establishment. Washington's most powerful people carry the banner: Led by Speaker Dennis Hastert, and with the president's approval, the Republican-controlled House recently voted to cripple the ability of citizens' groups called 527s (named after the provision of the tax code under which they are organized) to conduct independent advocacy that Washington's ruling class considers "unfair."

Which highlights the stark contradiction in McCain's doctrine and the media's applause of it. He and they assume, simultaneously, the following two propositions:

Proof that incumbent politicians are highly susceptible to corruption is the fact that the government they control is shot through with it. Yet that government should be regarded as a disinterested arbiter, untainted by politics and therefore qualified to regulate the content, quantity and timing of speech in campaigns that determine who controls the government. In the language of McCain's Imus appearance, the government is very much not "clean," but is so clean it can be trusted to regulate speech about itself.

McCain hopes that in 2008 pro-life Republicans will remember his pro-life record. But they will know that, regarding presidents and abortion, what matters are Supreme Court nominees. McCain favors judges who think the Constitution is so radically elastic that government regulation of speech about itself is compatible with the First Amendment. So Republican primary voters will wonder: Can President McCain be counted on to nominate justices who would correct such constitutional elasticities as the court's discovery of a virtually unlimited right -- one unnoticed between 1787 and 1973 -- to abortion?

McCain told Imus that he would, if necessary, sacrifice "quote First Amendment rights" to achieve "clean" government. If on Jan. 20, 2009, he were to swear to defend the Constitution, would he be thinking that the oath refers only to "the quote Constitution"? And what would that mean?

--------
George F. Will is a 1976 Pulitzer Prize winner, whose columns are syndicated in more than 400 magazines and newspapers worldwide.

Op-Ed Articles