On April 16, 2007, Virginia Tech student Seung-Hui Cho took his murderous rampage from classroom to classroom at his university, ultimately killing 32 students and staff, and then himself.

Cho knew that he would not meet armed resistance in his effort to garner his "15 minutes of fame." He knew this because, only a year before, Virginia Tech had successfully fought to keep Virginia Tech a "gun-free zone."

Obviously, however, Virginia Tech was not totally "gun-free" -- because the killer had no compunction about bringing a gun onto the campus. In fact, only the victims were disarmed.

Alaska State Senator John Coghill has now introduced legislation to insure that Virginia Tech's tragedy is not repeated at the University of Alaska.

The Coghill bill, Senate Bill 176, would strip the Regents of the University of Alaska of the ability to render their students and staff "sitting ducks" in the event of a tragedy.

The university could impose restrictions which were identical to state law, but it couldn't make up its own anti-gun regulations.

Since Newtown, there have been over 40 school shootings, and they all have one thing in common: they occurred in places where guns were prohibited. And many of them were committed by shooters who arrived at the crime scene, only after passing by venues where they knew they might face armed resistance.

Senate Bill 176 will allow law abiding teachers and students to protect themselves while at the University of Alaska.

ACTION: Contact your Alaska State Senator. Ask him to cosponsor or support Senate Bill 176

HOW TO CONTACT-WRITE YOUR STATE SENATOR:

Click here and then enter your zip code.

* Click on your Senator’s email address to start a message to him or her.

* Copy and paste the message below.

----- Pre-written Letter -----

Dear Senator:

On April 16, 2007, Virginia Tech student Seung-Hui Cho took his murderous rampage from classroom to classroom at his university, ultimately killing 32 students and staff, and then himself.

Cho knew that he would not meet armed resistance in his effort to garner his "15 minutes of fame." He knew this because, only a year before, Virginia Tech had successfully fought to keep Virginia Tech a "gun-free zone."

Obviously, however, Virginia Tech was not totally "gun-free" -- because the killer had no compunction about bringing a gun onto the campus. In fact, only the victims were disarmed.

Alaska State Senator John Coghill has now introduced legislation to insure that Virginia Tech's tragedy is not repeated at the University of Alaska.

The Coghill bill, Senate Bill 176, would strip the Regents of the University of Alaska of the ability to render their students and staff "sitting ducks" in the event of a tragedy.

The university could impose restrictions which were identical to state law, but it couldn't make up its own anti-gun regulations.

Since Newtown, there have been over 40 school shootings, and they all have one thing in common: they occurred in places where guns were prohibited. And many of them were committed by shooters who arrived at the crime scene, only after passing by venues where they knew they might face armed resistance.

That's why I am asking that you support Senate Bill 176 which will allow law abiding teachers and students to protect themselves while at the University of Alaska.